Home » ITS TOUGH TO BE A RED SOX FAN - a Seven-Decade Odyssey by Stanley Harris
ITS TOUGH TO BE A RED SOX FAN - a Seven-Decade Odyssey Stanley Harris

ITS TOUGH TO BE A RED SOX FAN - a Seven-Decade Odyssey

Stanley Harris

Published August 1st 2013
ISBN :
Kindle Edition
376 pages
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 About the Book 

It’s Tough To Be A Red Sox Fan describes the highs and lows, the joys and disappointments, and the gratification and frustration of following the Boston Red Sox as a child, a teenager, an adult, and a senior. Reading it may help explain to some theMoreIt’s Tough To Be A Red Sox Fan describes the highs and lows, the joys and disappointments, and the gratification and frustration of following the Boston Red Sox as a child, a teenager, an adult, and a senior. Reading it may help explain to some the peculiar paranoia that permeates the psyche of Red Sox fans.I went to my first Red Sox game in 1942 and learned the game of baseball by following a mediocre Red Sox team during the World War II years. But beginning in 1946 when they were American League champions, until 1949, the Red Sox were legitimate pennant contenders. As a young and naive fan, I thought that was the way it would always be. Then things fell apart. During the next seventeen years, the Sox finished third four times, fourth four times, fifth once, and sixth, seventh, eighth, and ninth twice each year. They were a terrible team with dysfunctional ownership and rotating-door managers – and I was their ardent fan.Recent generations of Red Sox fans, accustomed to contending teams, post-season play, league championships and World Series victories may find that hard to believe, but that’s the way it was.For more than seven decades the Red Sox have toyed with my emotions, lifting me to peaks and plunging me to depths - being a strike away from winning and crashing to defeat - having virtually no chance to win and yet emerging victorious.Like . .. . . Disappointed by the Sox for losing the World Series to the Cardinals in 1946.. . . Angered at the Sox for losing the one-game play-off to the Cleveland Indians in 1948, and the last two games of the 1949 season to the Yankees, costing them the pennant.. . . Distressed by the Impossible Dream Red Sox of 1967for losing the World Series again to the Cardinals.. . Thrilled when they won the magnificent sixth game of, the 1975 World Serie s and frustrated when they lost the seventh to the Reds.. . . In utter disbelief at Bucky !!#$#@%&*!! Dent hitting a home run for the Yankees to beat the Red Sox in the 1978 playoff game.. . . In agony when Mookie Wilson’s ground ball went through Bill Buckner’s legs in the sixth game of the 1986 World Series against the Mets when the Sox were one strike away from a championship.. . . Devastated by Aaron Boone’s walk-off home run against Tim Wakefield to win the 2003 ALCS for the Yankees. . . In utter misery when trailing the Yankees three games to none in the 2004 ALCS and in utter rapture when the Sox won the next four - the greatest experience of my personal Red Sox history. . . In absolute bliss when they won the 2004 World Series against the Cardinals.. . . Feeling such great satisfaction when they won the 2007 World Series against the Rockies and the mellowness that followed.. . . The disillusionment of the years that followed and great concern after the 2012 season.I experienced it all.The situations and events that are based on my personal experiences – being at a game, watching it on television, listening to it on the radio, or interacting with an involved individual – are uncolored by the opinions or partiality of anyone else.But many incidents are based on information, statistics and data obtained, reported and compiled by the media – by writers, analysts, and broadcasters who presumably had the access – that I did not, nor did any fan – to the inner workings of the Red Sox, i.e. what transpired in the clubhouse or front office, or between management and players, or between players.The attitudes and beliefs of sports fans about a team are, to a great extent, shaped by people who presumably are objective in their reporting and have greater knowledge of the team than its fans do.